Nicolás Rosenfeld has produced a capturing series of portraits of famous psychonauts, from Carlos Castañeda and John C Lilly to Syd Barrett and Nick Sand. Colorful, vibrant, and “apt” are all great ways to describe these.

Check them out:

The Incredibly Trippy Portrats of Nicolas Rosenfield

Carlos Castañeda became famous as the author of a series of books, starting with The Teachings of Don Juan in 1968, supposedly relating his training in shamanism by a Yaqui sorcerer. The books include experiences with several drugs, including peyote, jimsonweed, and mushrooms. Though they were considered true-to-life anthropological reports at first — and even earned him a Ph.D from UCLA — Castañeda’s books are now generally considered fiction.

Carlos Castañeda became famous as the author of a series of books, starting with The Teachings of Don Juan in 1968, supposedly relating his training in shamanism by a Yaqui sorcerer. The books include experiences with several drugs, including peyote, jimsonweed, and mushrooms. Though they were considered true-to-life anthropological reports at first — and even earned him a Ph.D from UCLA — Castañeda’s books are now generally considered fiction.

Maria Sabina was a Mazatec curandera (healer/shaman) who served psilocybin mushrooms to R. Gordon Wasson in 1955 — the first white man in recorded history to partake in the Mazatec mushroom ritual. Wasson’s story caused a sensation when it was published in Life magazine. By introducing ‘shrooms’ to the West, Wasson influenced the psychedelic 1960s and kickstarted the field of ethnomycology. Thousands of spiritual tourists — including Timothy Leary, Bob Dylan, and John Lennon — descended upon Maria Sabina’s little village in the following decade, and she came to regret ever offering the ‘divine mushrooms’ to foreigners.

Maria Sabina was a Mazatec curandera (healer/shaman) who served psilocybin mushrooms to R. Gordon Wasson in 1955 — the first white man in recorded history to partake in the Mazatec mushroom ritual. Wasson’s story caused a sensation when it was published in Life magazine. By introducing ‘shrooms’ to the West, Wasson influenced the psychedelic 1960s and kickstarted the field of ethnomycology.
Thousands of spiritual tourists — including Timothy Leary, Bob Dylan, and John Lennon — descended upon Maria Sabina’s little village in the following decade, and she came to regret ever offering the ‘divine mushrooms’ to foreigners.

 

In addition to getting visual eye-candy, appreciators of Nicolas’ art receive a little history lesson, too.

See more of the images at Psychedelic Frontier