Profile


<strong>carl
a. p. ruck</strong> is a professor of classical studies at Boston University.
His work with the Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann and the ethnomycologist R.
Gordon Wasson demonstrated that the ancient Greek Eleusinian Mystery was an
initiation involving an LSD-like visionary sacrament derived from ergot. In Persephone's Quest:
Entheogens and the Origins of Religion, he proclaimed the
centrality of psychoactive sacraments at the very beginnings of religion, employing the neologism "entheogen" to free the topic from the pejorative
connotations for words like <em>drug</em> or <em>hallucinogen</em>.

<strong>josé
alfredo gonzález celdrán</strong> is a professor of ancient Greek based in
Murcia, Spain. He is the author of an historical novel set in ancient Egypt at
the time of the heretical monotheistic pharaoh Akhenaten and a book on the role
of psychoactive mushrooms in myth and religion, as well as works with an
archaeologist on prehistoric rock paintings.

<strong>mark
a. hoffman</strong> is editor of Entheos: The Journal of Psychedelic Spirituality
and entheomedia.org. He has written on shamanism, ancient religions, early Christianity, and the role of visionary sacraments in Western mystery
tradition. He holds degrees in Religious Studies and Philosophy from San Diego
State University and currently lives in Taos, New Mexico.

<strong>carl
a. p. ruck</strong> is a professor of classical studies at Boston University.
His work with the Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann and the ethnomycologist R.
Gordon Wasson demonstrated that the ancient Greek Eleusinian Mystery was an
initiation involving an LSD-like visionary sacrament derived from ergot. In Persephone's Quest:
Entheogens and the Origins of Religion, he proclaimed the
centrality of psychoactive sacraments at the very beginnings of religion, employing the neologism "entheogen" to free the topic from the pejorative
connotations for words like <em>drug</em> or <em>hallucinogen</em>.

<strong>josé
alfredo gonzález celdrán</strong> is a professor of ancient Greek based in
Murcia, Spain. He is the author of an historical novel set in ancient Egypt at
the time of the heretical monotheistic pharaoh Akhenaten and a book on the role
of psychoactive mushrooms in myth and religion, as well as works with an
archaeologist on prehistoric rock paintings.

<strong>mark
a. hoffman</strong> is editor of Entheos: The Journal of Psychedelic Spirituality
and entheomedia.org. He has written on shamanism, ancient religions, early Christianity, and the role of visionary sacraments in Western mystery
tradition. He holds degrees in Religious Studies and Philosophy from San Diego
State University and currently lives in Taos, New Mexico.